Archive for the ‘Singapore’ Category

Resolving disputes between neighbours

May 27, 2017

ST Paper, 27 May 2017, Yishun residents build ‘wall’ to keep out nuisance neighbour

Feuding neighbours who cannot resolve their issues on their own or with the help of grassroots leaders can approach the Community Mediation Centre, which aims to resolve disputes without litigation.

Examples of disputes include complaints of excessive noise, smell or smoke, littering at or in the vicinity of the complainant’s place of residence, and trespassing.

But there is little the authorities can do if the neighbours do not want to make up or even turn up for mediation.

If mediation does not solve the problem, parties can file a claim with the Community Disputes Resolution Tribunals.

The tribunals, which are given powers to resolve disputes between neighbours under the Community Disputes Resolution Act passed in 2015, can order the payment of damages up to $20,000. It can also order a neighbour to stop an action or to apologise.

Supporting evidence, such as photographs, video and audio recordings and police reports, can be brought before the tribunal. If the neighbour refuses to comply with the court order, further legal steps may be taken.

New initiative to share excess harvest

April 15, 2017

ST, 2 Apr 2017, New initiative to share excess harvest

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We thank Miss Lee Kay Yan for her feedback (A little foraging for fruit and plants won’t hurt; March 28).

In early March, the National Parks Board started an initiative to share excess harvest with the public, as part of efforts to reduce horticultural waste.

Termed “Harvest Corner”, extra herbs and horticulture material generated from gardening sessions by volunteers are gathered and made available to members of the public.

This pilot project, which began in the Spice Garden at Fort Canning Park and will continue to run every Friday, has seen positive response from park visitors.

Members of the public who wish to learn more about our flora in Singapore can also download our DIY walks e-guides.

What’s Happening (Jan 2017 to Jun 2017) [PDF]

OneInbox, digital mailbox service for public, to end in June

April 15, 2017

ST, 6 Apr 2017, OneInbox, digital mailbox service for public, to end in June

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Five years after it was introduced, a digital mailbox for the public to receive government correspondence is being shut down in Jun 8, 2017, owing to low take-up rate and the costs to maintain it.

Called OneInbox, the service lets Singaporeans sign up for the free digital mailbox to view e-letters from public agencies such as the Central Provident Fund Board, Housing Board and Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore (Iras). The notices range from GST Voucher letters to Medisave deductions.

OneInbox was said to have cost the Government as much as $5 million to develop. The tender was awarded to local systems integrator CrimsonLogic. The targets were 250,000 users by the first year, and up to 800,000 in the third year.

The Government Technology Agency (GovTech) would not say how many eventually signed up for the service, part of the e-government masterplan, which then included the revamp of the eCitizen portal. But a report in June 2013 said just 3,000 users had signed up.

 

ST Forum

7 Apr 2017, Reasons given for OneInbox termination not convincing

13 Apr 2017, Low demand for ‘mailbox-only’ digital service

 

More Info

Are there digital channels that I can use to receive Government letters electronically?

 

Singapore Electricity Tariff Revision for Q2 (2017)

April 1, 2017

Singapore Electricity Tariff Revision for Q1 (2017)

TODAY, 1 Apr 2017

For the quarter 1 Apr to 30 Jun 2017, electricity tariffs will increase by an average of 6.1% or 1.20 cents per kWh compared to the previous quarter. This is due to a 12.0% increase in the cost of natural gas for electricity generation.

 

AVA – New licensing conditions for pet shops and farms

March 29, 2017

CNA, 28 Mar 2017, Tighter licensing conditions for pet shops and farms to take effect in April: AVA 

The changes, which take effect from Apr 1, were made to improve the housing, healthcare and management of animals, enhance their traceability and improve the accountability of pet businesses, said AVA.

Some of the revised regulations include:

– If two or more dogs are kept together, they must be compatible, and each dog must be able to move, turn around without hitting the sides of the kennel, stand upright, lie down and stretch.

– All retired breeding dogs must be kept separately from breeding dogs and segregated according to their gender.

– Puppies must be microchipped by nine weeks old and kittens microchipped by 12 weeks old.

– All breeding dogs must undergo an annual health check by a licensed veterinarian.

Members of the public can contact the AVA via its 24-hour hotline, 1800-476-1600.

See here for the full list of revised licensing conditions

 

NTU freshmen guaranteed 2-year stay on campus

March 17, 2017

TODAY, 16 Mar 2017, NTU freshmen guaranteed 2-year stay on campus
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Currently, the monthly rental fee for a single room ranges from S$340 to S$425 per student, while those staying in twin-sharing rooms each pay S$245 to S$320. Prof Kwok said that with more than 90 per cent of current demand met, there are no plans for the time being to build more residential halls in NTU. In recent years, demand for residential places has also gone up or are set to go up in other universities.

NUS charges the fees on a weekly basis: Those staying in single rooms pay a weekly rate of about S$110 to S$145 per student, while the weekly rate for a double room is S$75 per student.

Legal tender for coins

March 17, 2017

TNP, 17 Mar 2017,  MAS looking at legal tender limit for coins
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Current limits
$2 per denomination for five-cent, 10-cent and 20-cent coins, and $10 for 50-cent coins. There is no current limit for payment using one-dollar coins.

Proposed limits
Uniform legal tender limit of 10 coins per denomination in a single transaction for all denominations. This means that a payer can use up to 10 pieces each of five-cent, 10-cent, 20-cent, 50-cent and one-dollar coins per transaction. The maximum amount you can use coins to pay for a single transaction is S$18.50.

Consultation Paper on Revised Legal Tender Limit for Coins

Fresh grads finding it harder to land full-time jobs

February 23, 2017

TODAY, 22 Feb 2017, Fresh grads finding it harder to land full-time jobs: Survey

survey-fresh-graduates-from-3-uni

TODAY, 23 Feb 2017, One year, 50 applications before he gets first job

TNP, 23 Feb 2017, More graduates settling for temporary gigs

Salary Data & Career Research Center (Singapore)

Inform AVA when you sell or give away your dog

February 1, 2017

TODAY, 31 Jan 2017, New pet dog licensing rules to kick in from March 1: AVA

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SINGAPORE – From March 1, pet businesses must ensure that all dogs intended for sale are licensed by the Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA) before they are sold, the authority said on Tuesday (Jan 31). Pet businesses include pet importers, dog farms and pet shops.

To ensure that pet dogs continue to be licensed and traceable when they are sold, pet businesses must also transfer the ownership of the dogs to their new owners upon sale, which can be done using the AVA’s online Pet Animal Licensing System (PALS).

In addition, individual dog owners who sell or give away their dogs will have to inform AVA that they are no longer keeping the dogs. These owners will also be required to provide AVA with the particulars of the dog’s new owners, which can also be done using PALS.

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For example, the licence fee for one to 10 dogs is S$50 per annum, while the fees for having 101 to 200 dogs is S$1,000 per annum.

Those convicted of keeping an unlicensed dog face a fine of up to $5,000, while recalcitrant pet businesses may have their licences suspended or revoked, said the AVA.

For more information, visit the AVA’s website or call the 24-hour hotline at 1800 476 1600.

Giant clam shells are protected species

February 1, 2017

TNP, 1 Feb 2017, NUS students lambasted for taking giant clam shell
ST, 31 Jan 2017, NUS sailing trip draws flak after students return with giant clam shell

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Last month, 12 NUS students and alumni sailed to Indonesia’s Riau Islands for a week with Associate Professor Martin Henz, who teaches at NUS’ School of Computing and Faculty of Engineering.

They returned to Singapore with shells, including a giant clam shell, as keepsakes.

Environment groups and researchers pointed out that the giant clam is a protected species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Cites) and proper permits are needed before any animal parts can be imported across borders, including dead clam shells.

Giant clams play an important role in the building of coral reefs. Even after they die, their shells are deposited on the reefs, attracting marine life and enhancing biodiversity.Prof Henz, an avid sailor who has taken NUS students sailing in the region since 2013, said: “This has been a learning experience, and we will be more mindful of our actions in the future to neither leave anything behind nor remove anything from nature.”